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The Superior Express
Superior, Nebraska
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January 15, 2015     The Superior Express
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Classifieds Phone 402-879-3291 or 785-378-3191 or come to 148 E. Third in Superior or 111 E. Main in Mankato to place your ad. I COMPLETE AUTO body paint and repair. Rock chip repair, glass re- placement. Superior Paint and Body, 402-879-4190. 10-1 -tfc COMPLETE AUTOMOTIVE repair, air conditioning work, computer diagnos- tics. Tietjen Automotive. 340 N. Kan- sas, Superior. 402-879-4111. 10-33-fie SERVICING ALL MAKES and mod- els of furnaces and air conditioners. Scott TV and Appliance. 402-879- 3501. 10-11 -fie FARM, RESIDENTIAL, commemial wiring. Moeller Electric, Byron, 402- 236-8619. 10-14-tfc 12-Livestock S &amp; S BY-PRODUCT for prompt re- moval of dead cattle "and horses. 1- 800-919-8360. 12-35-tfc I BUY HORSES. Gordon Murray, Man- kato. Phone 785-534-0262 cell. 12-3-ffc 13-Machinery 2012 GREATPLAINS Turbomax, 30 ft., low acres. $40,500.402-768-8107 13-2-3p 14-Sale Calendar SATURDAY, MARCH 14, 11 a.m., acreage located at 1400 Hartley St., Superior, Neb. Selling 1,214 sq. ft., single story ranch style home located on five acres for Esther and the late Donald Meyer. Main level consists of living room, kitchen, three bedrooms and one bath, full basement is par- tially finished with rec room, laundry area and mechanical area, finished two car attached garage. Well con- structed and maintained home. Steel workshop building and several other outbuildings and sheds. Mikkelsen Auction and Realty LLC in charge of sale. 14-2-9p ROCK CREEK renegades modern- black powder gun show, early Ameri- can trade fair, Jan. 24 and 25. Lancaster Event Center, 84th & Have- lock, Lincoln, 402-477-6409 www.rockcreekrenegades.com. 14 GUN SHOW Jan. 17-18 Sat. 9-5 and Sun. 9-3 Topeka Kansas Expocente (19TH & Topeka Blvd) buy-sell-trade info: (563) 927-8176. 14 15-Opportunities WANTED: TRUCK driver for Norfolk- based flatbed operation c.ompany. Top pay! Our ddvers average over .40 per mile! Call 402-582-4791, see what we can offer you. 15 HAVE A disability and want to work? Prepare for, find, and keep a job at Nebraska VR. Learn more at vr.nebraska.gov or call 1-877-637- 3422. 15 NEBRASKA HUNTING land wanted! Earn thousands onyour land by leas- ing the hunting rights. Free evalua- tion and info packet. Liability cover- age included. The experts at Base Camp leasing have been bringing landowners and hunters together since 1999. For information e-mail: info @ basecampleasing.com. Call: 1 - 866-309-1507, basecampleasing .com. 15 $2,000 BETTER Business Bureau Foundation Student of Integrity Award Scholarships. Application deadline: 3-06-15. http://bbb.org/h/mqf or 402- 898-8526/800-649-6814 #8526. 15 $2,000 Better Business Bureau Foun- dation Student of Integrity Award Scholarships. Application deadline 3- 06-15. http://bbb.org/h/mqf or 316- 263-3146/800-856-2417 #4208. 15 16-Misc. for Sale SISCO HUGE APPLIANCE SALE Crosley Frigidaire Amana LG New Items Coming EVERYTHING MUST GO!! eeeeeeeee SA TELL/TE Ti/ Cheaper than Cable 138 E. 4th St. Superior Neb. 402-879-3705 00L_SlSCO m- Sales/Install Service Co MILEAGE BOOKS for sale from Su- perior Publishing Co. Help keep track of travel expenses for the I.R.S. 16-38-tfp Use the Classifieds, they work! Residential, Agricultural, & Commercial Title Insurance -Escrow & Closing Title & Lien Searches-Abstracts Ideal Title has the Nuckolls County documents of land patents from mid-18OOs from U.S. Homesteads to the present. DEAL Title LLE 354 N. Commercial o Superior, Neb. Phone 402-879-4341 idealtitle @yahoo.comj 21-Feed and Seed FOR SALE: large round bales of wheat straw. Phone 785-648-0145 or 402- 879-5007. 21-2-2p 22-Vehicles 2005 FORD Freestyle. Call 402-879- will rake place, at Mt. Hope Cemetery in Mankato at a later date. Carlson- Geisendorf Funeral Home Service, Salina, was in chargeof arrangements. Eric Aspergren Eric Lee Aspegren, 65, died last Wednesday, at his home in Natoma. Eric was born on Aug. 28, 1949, in Mankato, the son of Arthur D. and 4972 orcel1402-879-1848. 22-18-tfp Margaret A. (Lee) Aspegren. He grew up in the Burr Oak area and graduated 24-Real Estate QUARTER SECTION of Jewell County dry land for sale. 110 tillable, 30 timber and creek, 20 acres farm- stead and cattle lots. Five bedroom home and new heated shop. Sell all or partial. 785-794-2240. 24-3-3c FOUR BEDROOM house for sale by owner, 224 E 14th St., Superior, Neb. Call 970-310-3625 24-50-12p FOR SALE: 1,200 sq. ft., two bed- room, one bath home, all major appli- ances included. 16x32 garage, unat- tached, 34x24 insulated shop. All lo- cated at: 103 Appleby, Formoso, Kan., on a half acre of land. Asking $25,000. Contact 785-794-2490. 24-51 -tfc LENDERS OFFERING special govt programs for manufactured homes. $0 down for land owners. FHA for first time buyers. VA - $0 down for veter- ans. Section 184 for federal tribe mem- bers. Lenders accepting less than perfect credit. 1-866-858-6862. 24 36 Thank you I WOULD like to thank the Jewell County EMT's, clinic, hospital, Mitchell County Hospital, Salina Regional and Dr. Wittlow for my recent back sur- gery. Also, friends for food, cards, visits and phone calls. I am now living at the Crestvue Apartments No. 5. Lila Mizner 36-3-1p MARGIE MOSIER'S family would like to thank all who gave us support, sympathy and memorials on her pass- ing. Thank you, Pastor Van Stee, for a comforting service Sincerely, Marlys and Rich Mello, Leanna and Jim Bounds, Wes and Jan Mosier and Julie Mosier. 36-3-1p Obituaries Marjorie Baxa Marjorie Faye Baxa, 75, the daugh- ter of Harry Brown and Margaret (Marshall) Brown, was born March 27, 1939 near Republic. She died Jan. 7 at her rural Republic home. Marjorie grew up in the Republic area, attending the local public schools and graduating from Republic High School in 1957. On April 16, 1960, she was united in marriage to Dale Baxa. To this union was born Steve and Denise. The couple made their home near Republic. Marjorie was a homemaker and as- sisted with the farm operation through the years. She also managed the Rep City Inn Cafe at Republic for 13 years. She was a member of the Republic United Methodist Church, the MNO and the 8-12 Bridge Club. She enjoyed bridge and taught classes for several years. She was preceded in death by grand- son, Dylan G. Woodward; her parents; and three brothers, Curtis, Garald and Vic Brown. Survivors include her husband, Dale Baxa; one son, Steve Baxa of Salina; a daughter, Mrs. Jeff Woodward (Denise) of Belleville; grandchildren, Haley Baxa, Drew Baxa, Derek Baxa, Maggie Woodward and Riley Woodward; two brothers, Robert Brown of Webber, and Harry C. Brown of Belleville. Cremation was selected. Her fu- neral was held Monday at the Republic United Methodist Church, Republic, Pastor Roger Walls officiated. Inurement was in the Lake Cem- etery, rural Republic. Bachelor-Surber Funeral Home, was in charge of ar- rangements. Richard Endsley Richard Stanley "Dick" Endsley, 72, Salina, died Monday. He was born Oct. 3, 1942, in Mankato, the son of Frank R. and Joyce (Layland) Endsley. He enjoyed river fishing with his brother, Frank, walking in Sunset Park and around town, meeting and greet- ing friends. Dick was preceded in death by his parents; a daughter; a sister, Maria Marie; and a brother, Dean. Survivors include his sisters, Patricia Endsley and Mary Ellen Endsley, and brothers, Frank Endsley and Michael Endsley, all of Salina; nephews, Jerry Price and Jason Endsley; nieces, Patty Price, Trisha Endsley, and Misty Vasquez; and great nephews and nieces. There will be no visitation as cre- mation has taken place. Family burial from Burr Oak High School. After high school he attended Ft. Hays State University and obtained a bachelor's degree in business. After college he was married to Nancy Waiters in 1971. This union was blessed with a daughter Heather. After 16 years of marriage, Eric and Nancy were divorced. Eric worked in construction for many years. His favorite hobby was fishing. He was also an antique collec- tor with an eye for hidden treasures he could buy and sell. Survivors include his daughter, Heather Aspegren, of New York City; and his ex-wife, Nancy Aspegren of Russell. He was preceded in death by his parents. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, at the United Method- ist Church in Burr Oak. Cremation was selected by the family. An inurnment of the ashes will be held after the memorial service at the Burr Oak Cemetery. Pohlman-Vamer-Peeler Mortuary of Natoma is in charge of the arrange- ments. Roberta Rothchild Roberta L. Rothchild, 70, of Linconville, S.C., died Jan. 6. Born in Sevierville, Tenn., she was the daughter of the late Robert and Hazel Akins. Roberta (who to most locally was known as Robie) enjoyed fishing, telling jokes and being with her family. She liked to laugh and will be remembered as a loving wife, mother, grandmother and great-grand- mother. She is survived by her husband, Dennis Rothchild, Mankato; son, Jay Wheeler, Ladson, S.C.; two daughters, Mrs. Gregg Hill (Kathy), Lebanon, S.C., and Kelly Douglas, Summerville, S.C.; a brother, Robert T. Akins, Summerville, S.C.; two sisters, Hazel Pitchers, Summerville, S.C. and Debbie Mitchell, Cottageville, S.C.; eight grandchildren, Berlin Wheeler, Mandy Lynn B lanchard, Dakota Jordan, Ridge Jordan, Robert Douglas, Skyler Dou- glas, Kayla Douglas and Danielle Birzer; two great-grandchildren: Roberta was predeceased by her son, Robert Wheeler. Her funeral was held Saturday at the McAlister-Smith Funeral Home, Goose Creek Chapel. The family re- ceived friends prior to service from 12 until 1 p.m. at the funeral home. Earl Stafford, Jr. Earl Staffo-rd, Jt 90, Sylvia, died Saturday at Leisui'e Homest6id Nurs- ing Home in Stafford. He was bom Jan. 25, 1924, in Formoso, the son of Earl, Sr., and Minnie (Dunn) Stafford. On July 26, 1944, he married Geraldine Bechtold in Beloit. She preceded him in death. On May 26, 2007, he married Elsie Snowbarger at Sylvia. Earl was a field representative for the State of Kansas taxation, a former Jewell County sheriff, a local licensed lay minister in the Nazarene Church and a member of the Nazarene Church in Sylvia. Earl is survived by his wife; two sons, Richard of Ulysses and Stanley of Argyle, Texas; a daughter, Diane Stafford of Turon; 14 grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren; and two great- great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by a daughter, Joan Green; two sisters, Louise Field and Alice Dixon; four brothers, Ronald, Harry, Andrew and Milford; and one granddaughter, Holly Green. Visitation will be tomorrow (Fri- day) from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. at Larrison Funeral Home, 400 N. Martin St., Turon. His funeral will be Saturday at 10 a.m. at the Nazarene Church in Sylvia with Reverend Roberto Ibarra officiating. Burial will be at Caldwell Cemetery in Formoso. Wanda Mauk Wanda Jean "Jeannie" Mauk, 74, Minneapolis, died Jan. 1 at h home in Minneapolis. She was born Aug. 20, 1940, in Mankato to Floyd and Anna Briggs. Wanda worked at EIDorado Na- tional in Minneapolis and later in Salina before she retired. She was united in marriage with Therel U "Sam" Mauk July 27, 1978 in Minneapolis. He pre- ceded her in death on Dec. 12, 1991. She was also preceded in death by her parents and her daughter-in-law, Terri Penn. Her sister, Donna Meier, died Jan. 3. Survivors include her children, Mike and Jerry Penn, Mrs, Alan Kendall (Sharlene), Mrs. Randy Sumner (Chris); step-children Troy Mauk, Teresa Wheatley and Traci Hildebrand; a brother, Everett Briggs; 3.15 Parkview Haven Skilled Nursing Home Meadowlark Heights Assisted Living Deshler, Neb Applications are being accepted for Full-Part time afternoon shift CNA/MA at Parkview Haven and a Part time MA at Meadowlark Heights Shift differential, add on for experience. Benefit package for full time. For information and an application, call Judv 402-365-7237 : ::::I a sister, Shirley Williamson;halfbroth- ers, George Briggs and Robert Neeper; a half sister, Lcnora Jaske; and numer- ous grandchildren and great-grandchil- dren. The family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m. Jan. 5 at the Wilson Family Funeral Home, Minneapolis. Private services will be held and burial with burial in Highland Cemetery, Minne- apolis. Jewell Co. Memories I Continued from-page 3 postmaster, the Montrose post office ceased to exist Dec. 7. The eighth Kansas Bull Test at Be- loit was officially underway. There were 448 bulls representing 14 breeds on test. Visitors were welcome at the teSt station any day between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. We sold butcher cows mostly from $15 to $18. Eleven young cows sold for $23.30. Seven black whiteface steers at 462 pounds sold for $31.10. The first real snowstorm of the sea- son arrived. Snow continued to fall throughout the day with the accumula- tion of several inches in some areas. The Esbon Grade School Christ- mas program was held for a large crowd at the Esbon Rural High School. Raccoons seem to be plentiful along the creeks and bunters are having suc- cess with skins being at a good price. Dean Leonard; Ionia, underwent heart surgery at a Wichita hospital and is doing as well as can be expected. Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Noller, Esbon, were in Mankato. 20 years ago The Mankato City Council voted unanimously, to approve a building application for the Mankato Christian Church. Mankato High School woodwork- ing instructor Jerry Mick and his stu- dent Luke Wagner look on as the kin- dergartner Faryn Beam learned how to saw a board. The kindergarmers made birdhouses to rake home while high school students earned class credit in manufacturing techniques. A public notice warned that Jewell County Rural Water District No. I has exceeded the state and federal maxi- mum contaminant level allowed for nitrate in drinking water. ',Iewell County was slapped with mole freezing rain that coated the ice that was already on the streets and sidewalks making walking treacher- ous. The project to replace the sidewalk leading up to the doctor's office in Jewell has been completed. Also a cement ramp has been installed with hand rails leading to the front door of the Jewell Clinic. Wheat market analyst Gregg Doud has a message for Kansas wheat farm- ers: If you can't make money at $4 a bushel you'd better give it up. Most home owners are unaware that regardless of their income there are federal, state and local programs that will help them repair and remodel their house. 10 years ago White Rock Middle School and Esbon Grain, Esbon, was broken into. The building which houses Jeweil County Senior Center and Friendship Meal Site received new metal siding. Michael's Remodeling, Concordiadid the work. Phillips Oil and Gas, Mankato, took part in a program that united the public and private sectors in a common goal of safer highways:in Kansas during the period of heaviest holiday traffic be- tween Christmas and New Year's Day. Jewell County Commissioners ap- proved purchase of a building for use by the EMS department when they met m regular session. Central National Bank personnel announced a contribution of $100,000 to the North Central Kansas Commu- nity Network to support rural economic development in north central Kansas. The Jewell Library received a $7,000 federal grant to be used for automating the library collection. Students from White Rock Middle School were in Mankato to deliver bags of food to the Jewel l County Food Pantry. Mankato City Council members approved sale of the old fire house property on Jefferson street. Sacred Heart Catholic Church, Esbon, celebrated a 90th anniversary. Mitchell County Rural Water Dis- trict completed construction of a water tower north of Jewell and will soon construct another tower west of Jewell to serve customers of Jewell County. The City of Jewell received a recy- cling trailer, enabling them to have access to disposal of items at any time. The purchase was made possible by the Jeweli County Solid Waste De- partment, paying half of the cost. A professional is a man who can do his job when he doesn't feel like it. An amateur is a man who can't do his job when he does feel like it. I I Real Estate for Sale We have several fine houses in Superior and areaL III/0grLSm REAL EST4TE & 4UCll0N, LLC Gale Mikkelsen, Real Estate Broker (402) 879-4464 Dale Uhrmacher, Associate Broker (402) 225-4292 FOR KANSAS -NEBRASKA .... : SALESPERSONS Corey Mikkelsen ...... (402) 879-1504 Monte Imler. ............ (402) 879-4464 Residence (785) 794-2263 Brad Bouray .... Cell (402) 879-5927 NEBRASKA SALESPERSONS Selma Fergusdn ...... (402) 225-3641 ;ii 7 ''';:-' ' ,""' :;:"': .... i Thu'rsday, Januaw 15,2015 Post Rock Answers ing difficulties, laow long to wait to By Neil Cates, Post Rock Extension offer assistance, length of time before Calving season is here for some and just around the comer for many. Calv- ing can be one of the most rewarding, yet difficult times for cattle producers. Most cattle producers are veterans when it comes to calving but, it never hurts to review some things before the first calf drops. Usually that first calf makes an appearance earlier than ex- pected. A good place to start is by evaluat- ing calving areas. Make sure the area is clean including removing old bedding and excess manure. Inspect the facili- ties. Are all the gates in working order? Are welds broken that need attention or old boards that need to be replaced? What about making sure the head gate or chute is lubricated prop- erly and free of manure. Check the lights in the facilities to make sure they are still in working order. Make a checklist of supplies and equipment that will be needed: halter, cow restraint mechanisms; obstetrical lube and sleeves; obstetrical chains; calf jack' rags and applicator; frozen colostrum, bottle and esophageal feeder; electrolytes; iodine to treat na- vels; birth weight scales. Another important management practice is to develop a protocol con- mining what to do in instances of calv- THE SUPERIOR EXPRESS 7B providing colostrum and contact infor- mation for the veterinarian. The man- ager may know this information, but it is important to make sure all employ- ees and family members are aware as well. Plus in the heat of the moment sometimes common knowledge can be erased by adrenaline. What do you know :about the feed- ing at dusk theory? It is a common consensus that it is easier to supervise calving heifers and cows during the day than at night. So is it possible to increase the number of calves born during the daylight hours? One theory is that by feeding at dusk, the number of calves bom during the day versus night will be increased. The physiological mechanism of this is unknown, but some hormonal effect may be involved. There are many stud- ies that have supported this. The most convincing study sup- porting the theory was conducted in Iowa when 1,331 cows on 15 farms were fed once daily at dusk with 85 percent of the calves born between 6 a.m and 6 p.m. Starting the calves on the night feeding the week before the expected calving date or two to three weeks earlier had no apparent effects. Take time to inspect your facilities, develop your check list and perform other necessary duties prior to calving. Be sure to establish a working relation- ship with your veterinarian as well. Taking these steps and making sure everyone on the operation is familiar with your protocols will help make this calving season a successful one. II Recipes Sweet cinnamon rolls From the kitchen of Brenda Fullerton Moser l yellow cake mix 5 C. flour Combine dry cake mix and flour, mix well. 2 pkgs. yeast 2 1/2 C. warm water Dissolve yeast in water and add to dry mixture and beat. It will be stiff. Let rise 2 hours or until double in size. Punch down and roll out. Spread with melted margarine and sprinkle with cinnamon sugar. Roll up and cut 1 inch thick and place in greased pan with gooey in the bottom. Let rise and 'bake at 350 degrees 25-30 minutes. Gooey: 4 T. white sugar, 2 T. mar- garine, 5 T. brown sugar, nuts (opt.). Hold yourself responsible for a higher standard than anybody else ex- pects of you. Everyone Loves a Good History Book of Stories From Their Own Area Railroad Titles America's Shortest Interstate Railroad .................................................... $19.95 By Richard Schmeling. Tax $1.30, Shipping $3.50 The Nebraska-Kansas Railroad was owned and operated by the Ideal Cement company. The industrial railroad connected the plant at Superior with the quarry in Jewell county. It was the shortest inter-state rail road in the United States. This book recounts how the railroad helped build the United States. Burlington Route: The Wymore Story ....................................................... $19.95 The Wymore Story, by noted railroad historian Richard C. Kistler, Tax: $1.30, Shipping $3.50 is a classic account of ChicagO, Burlington and Quincy Railroad operations in the southeastern Nebraska region. The High Plains Route By Richard C. Kistler A History of the McCook Division of the Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad ............................... $29.95 The Santa Fe Railway in Nebraska by Richard C. Kistler Tax: $1.95; Shipping: $4.50 The "Grain Funnel" at Superior .............................................................................................................. $59.95 Tax: $3.90; Shipping: $5.50 Jewell County History History of Jewell County, Kansas .............................................................. $8.00 By M. Winsorand James A. Scarbrough Ta<: $0.52, Shipping $3.50 A reprint of the county's early settlements and the Indian atrocities committed within its borders. Burr Oak, The Roots Run Deep ................................................................ $20.00 The history of the Burr Oak community by Gloria D. Carman Tax $1.30; Shipping $4.50 The Bloody Saga of White Rock Reprinted and released by the daughter of a'uitor,'i=i';V.'Kliem'an " .............. %x...6..i..g.... $1 3.95 $ . , .ipping $3.50 What Price White Rock .............................................................................. $10.00 First published more than 60 years ago by the retired editor Tax: $0.65, Shipping $350 of the Burr Oak newspaper. White Rock Historical Sketches ................................................................. $3.00 An account of stories told by the early settlers of the Tax: $020, Shipping $2.50 White Rock Valley recorded by EIler Morton Warren and first published by The Superior Express Aug. 31, 1933 Fodder .....................................  .............. ; ................................ ...:.........:...: ......................... $12.00 By JenniSmall Oern "  " " ...... : ........ ....... " ..... :"Ta'x $0.i8,"$3.50" A reprint of the:popula'('s'letches, written by a hopefut"dewell'%-'tmnty'farmyirrwhohad-towalruntil she-was 31 years old to attend high school and college. While attending the state normal school at Emporia she began work for the famed William Allen White, publisher of the Emporia Gazette. Miss Owen specialized in human interest stories. She aimed to be neither humorous nor dramatic. Instead, she believed every person has a story and she said her job was to record that story. Republican Valley History Look up at the Hawks ....................................................................... $10,00 Book By Ruth Morgan Smith and Vivian Douglas Smith. Tax: $0.65, Shipping $3.50 This book tells the story of a family living near Bostwick in the 1930s. Available with a CD of the songs used in the Smith's program presented throughout the United State. Bluff to Bluff .................................................. . ............................................ $58.00 Stories told by survfvors of the 1935 Republican River Flood Tax: $3.77, Shi;ping $4.50 Bluff to Bluff Too ........................................................................................ $58.00 More stories told by survivors of the 1935 Republican River Flood Tax: $3.77, Shippmg $4.50 Hardship Trail ............................................................................................. $58.00 Stories gathered by the author of Bluff to Bluff Tax: $3.77, Shipping $4.50 Medicine Creek Journals ............................................................................ $24.95 By D. Jean Smith Tax: $1.62. Shippmg $3.50 Wolf's Rest By O. Jean Smith .................................................................................................. $24.95 Tax: $1.62, Shipping $3.50 A continuation of the Medicine Creek Journals story, the author shares more of the tales that put Wolf's Rest Ranch on the Nebraska map in the 1800s and its legendary characters including Sheriff Paddy Miles, and sharpshooters Doc Carver and Ena Raymonde. This book complements Medicine Creek Journals and is a "must read" for those who enjoyed reading the story of Ena Raymonde. Other Topics of Local Interest History of the World By Donn Crilly ................................................................. $48,00 Written by a Superior High School graduate and current resident Tax: $3.12, Shipping $650 of Superior this book provides an overview of the history of the world from a scientific perspective through 1945 Superior Memories ....................................................................................... $4.00 Tax: $0.26, Shipping $2.50 A return visit to Superior following W.W.II prompted Sumner Miller, a 1895 graduate of Superior H gh School, to record many of his memories of whatlife was like in the early years of the community Included is a story about the bicycle he purchased from Evelene Brodstone and many pictures of early Supenor. The First 100 Years ............................................................. $135.00 for 3 Books A reference history of Superior, Nebraska by Stan Sheets Tax: $8.78, Shipping $10.50 A Superior Romance .................................................................................. $14.95 A novel by Superior Native, Rob Williams Tax: $097, Shipping $3.50 Blizzard of 1949 .......................................................................................... $13.95 By Roy V. Alleman Tax: $0.91 Shipping $3.50 The Judge, The Gavel & The Gun ............................................................. $13.95 By Roy V. Alleman and Carol L Nowka Tax: $0.91, ShiFJping $3.50 Evelene, The Troubleshooter Was a Lady ................................................................................. $15,00 Follow the life of Evelene Brodstone Vestey from her childhood Tax $0.65, Shipping $3.50 in Superior to her work as a corporate troubleshooter and eventual marriage to Lord William Vestey. The Man Who Ate the 747 (Hard Cover) .................................................. $19.95 A love story set in Superior, Nebraska by Ben Sherwood Tax: $0.42, Shipping $3.50 The Death and Life of Charlie St. Cloud (Hard Cover) $22.95 By Ben Sherwood, the best selling author of "The man Who Eat the 747." Tax 1.49, Sh ;)ping $3.50 The Tinted Photograph ................................................................................ $9.95 A novel by H. M. Crilly, former publisher of The Superior Express Tax $0.65, Shipping $3.50 Portray's life in Superior after World War I 100 Years of Superior Living ....................................................................... $8.00 A history of Superior's first century prepared for the 1975 Centennial Tax: $0.52, Sh pping $3.50 Silent Vision by Judy Walker ....................................................................................................... $29.99 Tax: $1.95: Shipping $4.50 We will .t 0 ds For Ne;skaob;3eps "il b- e ?b. P'Kansas customers all books subject to local sales tax at point of delivery. Save on shipping by ordering several books at once. Books Available from The Superior Express 148 East Third Street P O nx, .n, o ..... :^.. ,.,= ....... ed .7 ,2 4