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The Superior Express
Superior, Nebraska
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September 18, 2014     The Superior Express
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September 18, 2014
 

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as part Innovative Wide-Area Shopping and Feature News This Leader published the week of September 15, 2014 of the Jewell County Record, Hebron Journa/Register, Clay Cou.nty News, The Superior Express. The next Leader will be published the week Adams Webster Nebraska Signal and of October 6, 2014. More Saline Jefferson Than 30,000 Readers By Dorothy Rosby If we're average -- not that very many of us are-- we'll spend a full year of ourliveslook- ing for lost ob- jects, eight months going through junk mail, and 43 days listening to recorded messages tell- ing us to please hold for the next available op- erator. I read it on the intemet, so it must be true. I don't mean to brag, but I'm way above average, at least when it comes to looking for misplaced items, possibly because I'm way above average at misplacing them. the last time I looked, which was wash, peroxideorbakingsoda?Do I'msureyoumakeupforitwiththe And I appreciate that someone has approximately ten minutes ago and I need tarter control, cavity protec- time you spend flipping through researched these timewasters, con- nowherenearenoughtimetomake tion, whitening, or breath freshen- television channels, something I sidering the effect they must be a lemon meringue pie, even with a ing more? Don't answer that. The almost never do, mostly because I havingon ourgross domesticprod- premade crust, point is I've been at the grocery can't get the remote from my hus- uct. How much time do we waste store fifteen minutes, and I still band. Unfortunately, there are many circling the block, looking for a don't have any food. However, I estimate I've spent others that have not been studied betterparkingspot?Therearetimes How much time do we devote at least two years of my life dig- yet. For example, how much time I could walk to the store, do my to looking f or our vehicles in park- ging through my purse looking for do we spend lying on the sofa, errand, and mosey back twice ih inglots?Ijustwastedtwentymin- my car keys and another six or trying to muster the motivation to the time it takes me to find the utes a few days ago myself, walk- seven months looking for my sun- get up and go to bed? perfect spot. ing back and forth, clicking my glasses. I've also used a significant Or complaining about the How much time do we spend key fob, hoping to hear my doors amount of time shuffling through weather instead of doing some- worrying about things that don't unlock.IwasaboUttohitthepanic thelargecolleetionofdiseountand thing about it? Or standing in the happen and would it be more help- button when I remembered I'dloyalty cards l haul with me every- middleoftheroom, wondering why ful to worry about things that do driven my son's car that day. Ah- where. I have so many that it' s hard we're there? happen? ha! to find the one I need for the busi- And how much time do we, asa How much time do we spend I'm just glad I realized that nessI'min, so l f'mally give up and nation, spend peering into our re- standing in the aisles at the grocery before I reported mine missing, pay without it. Not only is this frigerators, looking for food that's store trying to choose between all How much time-do we waste costing me money, it's wasting my not there? I know I do it far too the product varieties? Do I want digging through our purses? For time. And if you're in line behind much. It's like I think someone gel, paste, mint, or cinnamon tooth- you men, the answer is probably me, it's wasting a big chunk of made a lemon meringue pie since paste? Should I get it with mouth- "not that much." Good for you, but yours, too. 7 J. s for hosting ues (StatePoint) There's something summer, according to a survey con- pre-mixing a batch of your favorite percent back on grocery store pur- greataboutinvitingcompanyover, ducted by Bank of America. Acocktail so guests can serve them- chases for barbeques," said firing up the grill, sitting back and large majority -- 90 percent -- selves and you can focus on grill- Symon. eatingajuicyburger.Celebritychef equate barbequing with entertain- ing. He also encourages hosts to ToshowChefSymonyoursum- Michael Symon from the Food ing. make their budgets go further on merBBQcreations, usethehashtag Network and ABC's "The Chew," "Hosting a barbeque shouldn't groceries. #123BBQ on social media for a ispartneringwithBankofAmerica be stressful. The more you can "You can get rewarded for the chance to see your photo on to share tips for stress-free prepare before guests arrive, the purchases you make most by us- www.seriouseats.com/123bbq. barbequing, more you can enjoy your party," ing a credit card like the Don't miss the party. Make Nearly sixoutofl0Americans says Symon. BankAmericard Cash Rewards barbeques more fun with some plan to grill more than 15 times this For instance, Symon advises Credit Card. Customers earn two simple planning. Railroad commissioner visited Omaha in 1897 "I am out on my annual tri p of inspection over the land grant roads." former Confederate Gen. Wade Hampton told the Omaha Bee during his brief 1897 visit to Omaha. The Bee said on July 2: "General Wade Hampton of South Carolina. who, before the rebel- lion. was accounted the richest man in the south, who owned 1.000 slaves and whose plantations ex- tended over 20,000 acres along the banks of the Mississippi, was here yesterday, preparatory to a trip over the land grant railway lines of the transcontinental territory, in the ca- pacity of the United States com- missioner of railways.'" Hampton was accompanied by his daughter, "a fine type of the southern young woman," and by William Calhoun, the general's private secretary. The party arrived in the city over the Union Pacific Railroad shortly after 9 o'clock. A Bee reporter called upon Hampton in his railcar and obtained a short interview. Hampton began by twit- ting reporters: "The modem re- porter seems to be ubiquitous. I've got myself into heaps of trouble because I wouldn't see them. When I see one I am always reminded of an Englishman who said he fa- vored shooting off an admiral ev- ery once in a while just to make the ones living more valiant. That's the best way to treat reporters... "So you would like to know what I think of the Harris resolu- tion that's been presented to the Nebraska Timeline A Feature of the Nebraska State Historical Socict) ?.:i.;,~ :.i. :"~:/:~i:?::: i:i Wade Hampton, from The Photographic History of the Civil War in Ten Volumes: Volume Four, The Cavalry(New York, 1911). senate on the foreclosure of the tween the government and the U.S. government's lien on the Union Pacific, so that the latter UnionPacificRailroad?Well,I've may go on and operate its own read it and thought it over consid- road." The matter was resolved erably... What l would like to see is when on Nov. I, 1897, the Union a fair and equitable settlement be- Pacific was sold at a foreclosure sale in Omaha to a new group of investors, including E. H. Harriman, then president of the Illinois Central, for $110 million. Hampton expected to cover about twelve thousand miles dur- ing his six-week trip of inspection. During the morning T. M. Orr and P. J. Nichols of the Union Pacific called upon General Hampton to pay their respects. Later the party, with the exception of the general, who remained in his railcar, visited the points of interest around Omaha. In November of 1897 Hampton was replaced as U.S. Commissioner of Railroads by another former Confederate general, James Longstreet, who served until 1904. The Bee on May 30 noted that P. P. Shelby, formerly of Omaha, was vying for the position, but he was unsuccessful. To learn more about the pro- grams and services of the Nebraska State Historical Society, call i-800- 833-6747, or visit our website at www.nebraskahistory.org. Turn personal obstacles into triumphs (StaP, Point) Everyone faces set- backs i~ life. While those personal obstacles can lead to disappointing outcomes, they can also be bar. nessed into personal motivators, say experts. "When it comes to success, set- backs can be used to motivate one to action, rather than the alterna- tive," says five-time New York Timesbest-selling authorandjour- nalist Josh Young, who has studied this concept intimately. As author of And Give up Showbiz?, the new biography of illustrious personal injury lawyer Fred Levin, Young documents the rise and success of someone to whom life handed lem- ons. Levin is listed in every edition of "Best Lawyers in America" and is inducted into the Trial Lawyers Hall of Fame. But his still-thriving legal career that spans over a half- century wasn't written in the stars. Levin grew up the son of a pawn- broker and dog track manager at the end of the Great Depression. Barely passing college, his success was certainly against the odds. Having closely studied and tracked Levin' s exponential rise to success; Young is offering insights into how to turn your impediments When a door is closed, open a window: When your limitations are beyond your control, view them as opportunities. As a Jewish lawyer, few doors were open to Levin in the early 1960s, especially in the particularly profitable area of cor- porate law. Levin leveraged this anti-Semitism that was prevalent at the start of his career to forge a path for himself as a personal in- jury lawyer -- a profession that was then in its infancy and distained by the established, but would eventu- ally become wildly lucrative. Levin also harnessed his own personal experiences with discrimi- nation to become an open advocate for African Americans and gays, Continued to page 7